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Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

7 edition of Reactive hydrocarbons in the atmosphere found in the catalog.

Reactive hydrocarbons in the atmosphere

  • 208 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Academic Press in San Diego .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Volatile organic compounds -- Environmental aspects.,
  • Hydrocarbons -- Environmental aspects.,
  • Atmospheric chemistry.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by C. Nicholas Hewitt.
    ContributionsHewitt, C. N.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTD196.O73 R43 1999
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 322 p. :
    Number of Pages322
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL398041M
    ISBN 100123462401
    LC Control Number98086876
    OCLC/WorldCa40308039

      Midgley P.M., McCulloch A. () Properties and Applications of Industrial Halocarbons. In: Fabian P., Singh O.N. (eds) Reactive Halogen Compounds in the Atmosphere. The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry (Vol. 4 Series: Air Pollution), vol by: Use the links below to find out how this reactive group interacts with any of the reactive groups in the database. The predicted hazards and gas byproducts for each reactive group pair will be displayed, as well as documentation and references that were used to make the reactivity predictions. Mix Hydrocarbons, Aromatic with.

    The atmospheric persistence of PAHs has received considerable attention in recent years and continues to be actively investigated. Two extreme situations can be envisioned. In the absence of any chemical interaction, the lifetime of PAHs adsorbed onto particles will depend solely on physical characteristics—the size of the carrier particle and scavenging processes, including wet and dry. A) carbon monoxide make up over 60% (by mass) of all air pollutants emitted into the atmosphere. B) the concentration of carbon monoxide is higher in urban areas than in rural areas. C) people exposed to carbon monoxide have a higher risk of heart attacks.

    CHAPTER OZONE AIR POLLUTION So far we have emphasized the beneficial nature of tropospheric O3 arise from high emissions of NOx and of various reactive hydrocarbons (including alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, and Figure Cycling of HOx and O3 production in a polluted atmosphere. Figure is a diagram of the mechanism. The organic. Isoprene and other non-methane hydrocarbons from seaweeds: A source of reactive hydrocarbons to the atmosphere Article in Marine Chemistry 88() August with Reads.


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Reactive hydrocarbons in the atmosphere Download PDF EPUB FB2

Reactive Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere provides comprehensive and up-to-date reviews covering all aspects of the behavior, sources, occurrence, and chemistry of these compounds. The book considers both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, plus their effects in the atmosphere at local, regional, and global Edition: 1.

Reactive Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere Paperback – by C. Nicholas Hewitt (Editor) See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ $ Paperback "Please retry" $ Format: Paperback.

Reactive Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere provides comprehensive and up-to-date Reactive hydrocarbons in the atmosphere book covering all aspects of the behavior, sources, occurrence, and chemistry of these compounds.

The book considers both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, plus their effects in the atmosphere at. Substitutes are produced and emitted today, partly halogenated hydrocarbons, some of which are highly reactive in the troposphere. Along with reactive substances of natural origin, they have opened a new dimension of atmospheric photochemistry.

This handbook volume deals with these reactive halogen compounds and their provides a Format: Hardcover. Reactive Halogen Compounds in the Atmosphere (The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry) [Peter Fabian] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Scientific evidence clearly shows that chlorine and bromine compounds, such as CFCs, released into the atmosphere are responsible for continuous and progressive global ozone losses superimposed by dramatic seasonal ozone Cited by: Substitutes are produced and emitted today, partly halogenated hydrocarbons, some of which are highly reactive in the troposphere.

Along with reactive substances of natural origin, they have opened a new dimension of atmospheric photochemistry. Th e chapters in Reactive Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere, each written by an expert (or experts) in the specific subject area, are concerned with the role of reactive organic compounds in the photochemistry occur­ ring in the atmosphere.

Discussed are emis­ sions of organic compounds from anthro­ pogenic sources; emissions of organic com­Cited by: 3. Title: Reactive Hydrocarbons In The Atmosphere, Author: Amberly Peart, Name: Reactive Hydrocarbons In The Atmosphere, Length: 5 pages, Page:.

This chapter discusses the reactivity of hydrocarbons in the atmosphere on the basis of aerometric observations made at different tropospheric sites. The rapid and selective removal from the atmosphere of components capable of reacting rapidly with OH radicals, NO 3 radicals, and ozone suggests that photochemical pollution is the main tropospheric sink for by: 6 Global Distribution of Reactive Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere B.

Bonsang and C. Boissard I. Introduction II. Campaigns III. Vertical Distribution IV. Ground-Level Distributions V. Conclusions References 7 Reactive Hydrocarbons and Photochemical Air Pollution R. Derwent I. Introduction II. Reactive Hydrocarbons and. Chapter 6 Global Distribution of Reactive Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere obtained, using flask samples, by Rudolph et al.

() at 70 ~ S, who calcu- lated yearly averaged mixing ratios of pptv for ethene and of pptv for propene, with minima close to and pptv, by: Print book: EnglishView all editions and formats Summary: This text describes the state of knowledge, in the late s, of the emissions, distribution, chemistry and analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere at urban, regional and global scales.

Abstract. The emissions of reactive volatile organic compounds into the atmosphere from biogenic and anthropogenic sources and the subsequent interaction of these organic compounds with oxides of nitrogen in the presence of sunlight lead to the formation of photochemical air pollution, now recognized to affect much of Europe, the United States, and many regions and urban areas elsewhere around Cited by: 3.

Trace concentrations of highly reactive hydrocarbons of biogenic origin have been proposed for some time as being important in aerosol formation processes in the atmosphere.

More recently, assessments of potential photochemical reactions in the troposphere have proposed a role in the atmospheric ozone cycle for hydrocarbons, even for compounds such as methane that had Cited by: J.W.

Dacey, H.J. Zemmelink, in Encyclopedia of Ocean Sciences (Second Edition), Nonmethane Hydrocarbons. Nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are important reactive gases in the atmosphere since they provide a sink for hydroxyl radicals and play key roles in the production and destruction of ozone in the troposphere.

NMHCs generally refer to the C 2 –C 4 series, notably ethane, ethene. Figure 1: Overview of hydrocarbons in the atmosphere: subgroups, origin and environmental relevance A number of subgroups of functionalized hydrocarbons, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides (e.g.

1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4- Individual reactive hydrocarbons File Size: KB. Reactive hydrocarbons play a fundamental role in photochemical air pollution that has been recognized for the past 40 or so years.

Over the intervening period, understanding has grown concerning the fast photochemical reactions occurring in the sunlit atmospheric boundary by: Figure Cycling of HOx and O3 production in a polluted atmosphere. Figure is a diagram of the mechanism. The organic radicals RO2 and RO propagate the reaction chain and are thus considered part of the HOx radical family.

One chain propagation cycle -produces two O3 molecules (one from reaction and one from reaction).In a polluted atmosphere, we can assume that chain propagation is. Hydrocarbons Carbon Compounds in the Atmosphere Let's look at the molecules in the atmosphere. Most of the molecules are either N 2, at 78% of the atmospheric gases, or O 2, at 21% of the atmospheric of the others are in small concentrations.

Carbon Compounds in the Atmosphere Let's look at the molecules in the atmosphere. Most of the molecules are either N 2, at 78% of the atmospheric gases, or O 2, at 21% of the atmospheric gases. All of the others are in small concentrations. These include the carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and halocarbons (molecules with carbon bonded to F, Cl, Br File Size: KB.

Hydrocarbons play a significant role in the chemistry of the troposphere. They are not only emitted into the atmosphere from a wide variety of natural and anthropogenic sources but they may also. A leading cause of polluted air in urban atmospheres is the interaction of sunlight with an air mixture containing nitrogen oxides and reactive hydrocarbons.

Several classes of hydrocarbons are highly reactive hydrocarbons; one is the alkenes, the subject of "The Mechanisms of the Atmospheric Oxidation of the Alkenes" (Calvert, et al., OUP, ).5/5(1). C. Nicholas Hewitt (ed.): Reactive Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere Russell K.

Monson 1 Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry vol pages – () Cite this articleAuthor: Russell K. Monson.